NewTran Solutions
              Improving Transportation Systems

Projects

NewTran's engineering staff has participated as either project engineers, project managers or both on the following projects:

Roadway & Bridge (not complete listing)

 

US 270, Latimer County, Oklahoma: This project started at the west edge of Red Oak, Oklahoma and extended west 5.89 miles.  The project scope was to add shoulders and resurface the existing two-lane roadway.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway & bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included seven consulting firms.  A key design element was the analysis and correction of a flood prone area which required the replacement of an existing railroad culvert adjacent to the highway.  The existing double four by four masonry structure was replaced with a double eight by five pre-cast reinforced concrete box.  The railroad allowed one week for the contractor to replace the existing structure and get the railroad line operational.  The project required three property acquisitions and five utility relocations. 

 

SH 1/63, Pittsburg & Latimer Counties, Oklahoma: This project started at the junction of US-270 east of Hartshorne and extended east 4.91 miles.  The project scope was to widen and resurface the existing bi-directional facility, construct a new alignment to correct a substandard reverse curve condition, construct a new bridge, and widen an existing bridge class masonry box.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included a new alignment, which included a multi-span PC beam bridge over Gaines Creek, and the extension of a multi-cell masonry bridge box.  Archeological artifacts were discovered within the originally proposed Gaines Creek realignment corridor, which forced a significant design revision late in the detailed design phase.  An alternate alignment was developed and the project was let to construction ahead of schedule.  The project required twenty-five property acquisitions, three condemnations, and seven utility relocations. 

 

US 70, McCurtain County, Oklahoma: This project started at the junction of the US 70 truck bypass at Idabel and extended west 6.6 miles.  The scope of this two-phase project was to upgrade the existing bi-directional facility to a four-lane divided facility with a curb and gutter section through Garvin, Oklahoma.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included a new parallel alignment and a curb and gutter section in Garvin, Oklahoma.  A non-standard typical roadway section was developed for this project to deal with the highly plastic soils, identified by the geotechnical investigation.  The sub-grade was specified to be initially modified with lime, to create a solid working platform for additional paving operations, and to be finally modified with Fly-Ash, to maintain the sub-grades “modified” strength characteristics.  The Fly-Ash Sub-grade Modification was specified to off-set strength loss over time, which is typical of lime-treated sub-grades.  To help facilitate better sub-surface drainage the aggregate base material was extended beyond the pavement edge.  The project required twenty-nine property acquisitions, four condemnations, seven residential relocations, and seven utility relocations. 

 

SH 31, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma: This project started at the junction of US 270 and West Street in McAlester, Oklahoma and extended west 3.09 miles.  The scope of this project was to upgrade the existing two-lane road to a four-lane undivided roadway with curb and gutter and storm sewer.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included a new alignment, a new intersection of SH 31 and US 270, two bridge class reinforced concrete boxes, and a continuous storm sewer system.  The new alignment paralleled the Arkansas-Oklahoma-Kansas (AOK) Railroad and required significant coordination to minimize operational impacts.  The project required twenty-eight property acquisitions, six condemnations, one residential relocation and seven utility relocations. 

 

US 70, Choctaw County, Oklahoma: The scope of this three-phase project was to add shoulders and resurface the existing two-lane roadway.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included a visual distress survey of the existing Portland Cement Concrete Pavement, vertical design exceptions (approved by the Federal Highway Administration) to minimize right-of-way impacts, and construction sequencing to avoid impacting a cemetery near Soper, Oklahoma.  The visual distress survey was utilized to verify the condition of the existing pavement for the overlay design and identify locations for slab replacement.  The project required two utility relocations. 

 

US 70, Bryan County, Oklahoma: The project started at Mead, Oklahoma and extended east to Durant, Oklahoma.  The scope of this two-phase project was to upgrade the existing bi-directional facility to a four-lane undivided facility with a sixteen-foot continuous turning lane and a curb and gutter section in Mead and Durant.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included a new railroad overpass at Mead, a storm sewer system in Durant, two multi-cell bridge class reinforced concrete boxes, and a visual distress survey of the existing Portland Cement Concrete Pavement.  The project required 100 property acquisitions, eight condemnations, two residential relocations, six commercial relocations, and seven utility relocations.

 

SH 3, Atoka County, Oklahoma: The project started 6.7 miles east of Atoka Oklahoma and extended southeast on S.H. 3 for 5.33 miles.  The scope of this two-phase project was to upgrade the existing bi-directional facility to a four-lane divided facility with a curb and gutter section through Lane, Oklahoma.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included six consulting firms.  Key design elements included two pre-stressed PC Beam Bridges, and a four-lane undivided curb and gutter section without additional right-of-way in Lane.  The project required twenty-nine property acquisitions, six condemnations, four residential relocations, and four utility relocations. 

 

US 70, Marshall County, Oklahoma: The project started at the east edge of Kingston, Oklahoma and extended approximately 4.0 miles east to the Roosevelt Bridge.  The scope of this two-phase project was to upgrade the existing bi-directional facility to a four-lane divided facility with an undivided section adjacent to the state lodge near the east end.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included seven consulting firms.  Key design elements included a segmental retaining wall system, and alignment modifications to avoid a subsidence area.  The project required seventy-three property acquisitions, eight condemnations, four residential relocations, six commercial relocations, and six utility relocations. 

 

SH 49 Four-Lane Upgrade, Comanche County, Oklahoma: The project started at the I-44 and SH-49 Junction and extended west approximately four miles.  The scope of this three-phase project was to upgrade the existing bi-directional facility to a four-lane divided facility.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The project development team included four consulting firms.  ODOT completed right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  Key design elements included Load Resistance Factor (LRFD) Design for extending two bridge class reinforced concrete boxes and 20 foot vertical cut sections in granite.

        

HE Bailey Turnpike, Grady County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project was restoration of the existing concrete pavement via repair and replacement of the deteriorated dowel jointed concrete panels.  Prior to this project the earthen berm median of the existing pavement section had been graded down and paved and a continuous barrier wall was constructed.  The median project limited rehabilitation options for the existing pavement section, since a white-topping or resurfacing would not align with the recently paved median section.  The Oklahoma Turnpike Authority approved replacing multiple and isolated panels rather than total reconstruction. 

 

US 59, Leflore County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project consisted of upgrading the existing two-lane roadway through Panama, Oklahoma to a four lane curb and gutter section with storm sewer.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  The hydraulic design was particularly challenging for this project.  The outlet channels consisted primarily of rock lined ditches, which in many cases were either collapsed or completely silted up.  The poor condition of these outlet channels had created a significant flooding problem for the downtown area.  The project scope was expanded to include clearing out and lining the existing outlet channels which allowed the new storm sewer system to drain effectively. 

 

US 59, Adair County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project was to realign and upgrade US 59 through Stilwell, Oklahoma to a four lane curb and gutter section with storm sewer.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  Key design elements included the mainline horizontal alignment, storm sewer, tie-back transitions and improved intersections.

 

US 169, Rogers County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project was to upgrade the existing facility to a four-lane divided facility with an undivided curb and gutter section in Oologah, Oklahoma.  Project development included a geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations. 

 

I-40, Canadian County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project was to repair and resurface the existing pavement surface.  Several pavement rehabilitation technologies were utilized for this project including dowel bar retrofit, slab jacking, grout injection, and diamond grinding.

 

I-35, Love County, Oklahoma: The scope of this project was to repair and resurface the existing pavement surface via spot repair and micro-surfacing.

 

Willis Road, City of Tahlequah, Oklahoma: This project started at the intersection of Wilis Road and Whitmore Lane and extended east along Willis Road to US-62 in Tahlequah, OK.  The scope of the project was to reconstruct the existing two lane roadway to include curb & gutter and storm sewer.  The project included a 5-cell precast bridge box and was later modified to include sidewalk.  Project development included an environmental study (EA), geotechnical investigation, roadway & bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and multiple utility relocations. 

 

Prue Road, Osage County, Oklahoma: This project started at the intersection of Prue Road and W. Chickasaw Road in Osage County and extended northerly 5.9 miles along Prue Road.  The project scope was to reconstruct the existing two-lane roadway, improve the horizontal and vertical geometry, replace drainage structures, add shoulders and improve roadside safety.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  Traffic control and construction sequencing was a significant design challenge for this project which included four mainline typical sections. 

 

Chimney Rock Road, Mayes County, Oklahoma: This project along Chimney Rock Road in Mayes County started at the intersection of US-82 and extended east approximately two miles.  The project scope was to reconstruct the existing two-lane roadway, improve the horizontal and vertical geometry, replace drainage structures, improve the connecting intersection geometry, add shoulders and improve roadside safety.  Project development included an environmental study, geotechnical investigation, roadway & bridge design, right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations.  A major design objective was to eliminate the existing broken-back curves along the alignment which may have contributed to a fatality.  One challenging aspect of the design included optimizing the horizontal alignment to meet current design criteria while minimizing earthwork and right-of-way impacts near restricted Indian lands.

 

Program Management

 

ODOT Division II Capital Improvement Projects, Project Manager responsible for general coordination and communications with project team (CIP Program Manager, ODOT, Sub-consultants, FHWA and various review agencies), contract administration,  progress tracking/reporting, scheduling and task order development and negotiations.  Prepared and negotiated task orders for environmental documentation, surveying, geotechnical investigations, design, right-of-way acquisition, and utility relocation coordination services.  Developed baseline/milestone CPM schedules.  Monitored and reported project scope (scope creep), budget, and schedule via monthly progress reports and milestone plan submissions and reviews with ODOT and FHWA. 

Transportation Planning

 

I-69/Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC) Study, Texas.  South Area Manager responsible for coordinating and managing the efforts of four section engineers, which were selected by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to complete the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental planning and documentation on six sections of independent utility (SIU) of the I-69 National Study Area in Texas.   Responsibilities included management, administration, section coordination, oversight of engineering and environmental criteria conformance, and quality control for six sections (405 miles) of independent utility within the I-69 National Study Corridor in Texas.  The initial program objective was to develop environmental impact statements (EIS), achieve Records of Decision (ROD) and develop preliminary schematics for all 14 SIUs.  In 2002 the scope of the program expanded to include planning and NEPA documentation, via a two-tiered process, for the I-69/Trans-Texas Corridor.  The first tier will produce a single EIS for the entire I-69/TTC in Texas.  The study area spans approximately 1,000 miles in Texas from Laredo, Pharr and Brownsville in the Lower Rio Grande Valley to the Northeast corner of the state at Texarkana and into Louisiana near Shreveport.

 

Transit Rail Feasibility Study from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma to Union Station in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Scope of work provided as subconsultant included identification of potential ridership, multi-modal station location, infrastructure impacts, and public informational meetings.  Participation included evaluation of potential station locations and infrastructure requirements/impacts.